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Professor David Newberry

Professor David Newberry

Emeritus Professor, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge and Research Director of the Cambridge Electricity Policy Research Group. Educated at Cambridge with degrees in Mathematics and Economics, President of the European Economic Association in 1996, awarded the IAEE 2002 Outstanding Contributions to the Profession of Energy Economics Award. Formerly economic advisor to Ofgem, Ofwat, and to the Office of Rail Regulation, member of the Competition Commission, chairman of the Dutch Electricity Market Surveillance Committee, currently member of the academic panel of environmental economists, DEFRA. He has recently advised DECC and the House of Commons on Electricity Market Reform, and Ofgem on transmission price reforms. He has managed research projects on utility privatisation and regulation, electricity restructuring and market design, transmission access pricing, and has active research on climate change policies, merger analysis in energy markets and the design of energy policy and energy taxation. Recent books include A European Market for Electricity? (with others), and Privatization, Restructuring and Regulation of Network Utilities. He is guest editor of The Energy Journal (2005) issue on European electricity liberalisation, and recently honoured with Papers in Honor of David Newbery: The future of electricity, in The Energy Journal (2008).


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A key area of research at 4CMR over the past 5 years has been the development of the Future Technology Transformation model, used in exploring how policies influence global technology and carbon. This includes an on-line visualisation tool so you can view our results.

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4CMR works closely with the Cambridge Centre for Environment, Energy and Natural Resource Governance, with overlapping interests, skills and projects. C-EENRG is also located in the Department of Land Economy, with a core mission to "conduct integrative research on the governance of environmental transitions, understood as social and technological processes driven by environmental constraints that lead to fundamental changes in social organisation."

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